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Telehandlers are multi-purpose machines that can lift, transport, and position different kinds of objects and materials. A telehandler, which is short for “telescopic handler,” can be fitted with a variety of extensions that enable it to lift, move, and position a wide variety of objects, including bricks, gravel, and lumber. These multifunctional machines are known as the “workhorses” of the construction site since they are usually the first ones to arrive on the job and the last to go.

Telescopic handlers are designed specifically for moving and handling materials, and by adding more accessories, these adaptable tools can be used for a wide range of worksite duties, such as,

  • setting up initial materials at the beginning of a job,
  • lifting palletized and hung loads, and
  • cleaning up the job site afterwards.

Thus, it’s quite essential to have an understanding of how telehandlers work and their applications so that you can provide the best possible results as per the requirements.

Why should you use a telescopic handler?

In today’s market, there is no dearth of options to complete your multi-layered job requirements. Therefore, we are always looking for cheaper yet more efficient options that can not only improve productivity but are also easier to adapt to specific work environments. Telescopic handlers provide similar benefits, which is why we encourage you to stay up-to-date and surely sign up for a telescopic handler course in NZ.

The following factors are reasons why you should consider using a telehandler.

It’s an affordable option for your business.

Through the use of a few different attachments, a single telehandler is capable of performing a wide range of different material handling jobs.

“Pick and carry”-ing the supplies.

Telehandlers provide a productive technique to move items around a construction site in a timely manner.

Far better reachability for placing items.

Telehandlers are extremely useful for placing materials in difficult-to-reach areas because of their outstanding lift capacity, height, and forward reach.

You are engaged in outdoor, difficult terrain work.

These vehicles have four-wheel drive and four-wheel steering, allowing them to climb steep inclines and power across rugged terrain.

What kind of licence does one need to drive a telescopic handler in NZ?

Even though the most common attachment used in telescopic handlers is a fork, these machines have such a wide range of applications and more attachments that they actually do require their own specialised training. Therefore, if you want to learn how to use one, sign up for a telescopic handler course in NZ today!

In New Zealand, it appears that a W endorsement is required for the driver of a telehandler, although this does not appear to cover the telehandler’s extending boom and stabiliser legs, nor does it cover loading with forks. When compared to a loader or a forklift, a telehandler has a unique stability triangle and distinct tipping points. It’s important for us to realise that there are multiple categories of telehandlers, each of which has varied licensing requirements depending on the attachment that is installed.

For telehandlers equipped with forks, buckets, hooks, jibs, or man-cages, our recommendation is that the operator has successfully completed the following training:

1) Telehandler with Fixed Boom

  • A valid driver’s licence (With the correct licence class for the weight of the telehandler).
  • W Endorsement (Special-type vehicle that runs on wheels).
  • NZQA Unit Standard 23637 – Operate a Telehandler (General use of a telehandler).
  • NZQA Unit Standard 17695 – Use a mobile plant to attach, lift, move, and put loads (Lifting & loading with forks or Bucket).
  • Demonstrate and apply knowledge of safely slinging routine weights in accordance with NZQA Unit Standard 30072. (Lifting with hooks or jib).

 2) Telehandler with Rotating Boom (360-degree slew)

  • A valid driver’s licence (With the correct licence class for the weight of the telehandler)
  • W Endorsement (Special-type vehicle that runs on wheels)
  • NZQA Unit Standard 23637 – Operate a Telehandler  (General use of a telehandler)
  • NZQA Unit Standard 17695 – Use a mobile plant to attach, lift, move, and put loads (Lifting & loading with forks or Bucket).
  • NZQA Unit Standard 30072 – Demonstrate and apply knowledge of safely slinging routine weights in accordance with NZQA Unit Standard 30072. (Lifting with hooks or jib).
  • NZQA Unit Standard 3789 – Sling a variety of consistent loads and safely operate a crane- (Using as a crane with a winch)
  • Training for Crane Operators (Because of the rotating boom of the telehandler, it is classed as a crane when fitted with a hook, jib or winch, and the operator is recommended to have the correct training or licence ACOP for cranes).

3) Telehandler with Man-Cage Fixed or Rotating Boom

  • A valid driver’s licence (With the correct licence class for the weight of the telehandler)
  • W Endorsement (Special-type vehicle that runs on wheels)
  • Operate a Telehandler, NZQA Unit Standard 23637 (General use of a telehandler)
  • NZQA Unit Standard 17695: Use mobile plant to attach, lift, move, and put loads (Lifting & loading with forks or Bucket)
  • Demonstrate knowledge of slinging, lifting, transporting, and positioning loads with a mobile plant in accordance with NZQA Unit Standard 20875. (Lifting with hooks or jib)
  • EWP Training (The machine must comply with AS/NZS 1418 Part 10 2011/AS2550.10 when used as a Mobile Elevated Work Platform (MEWP), and the operator needs EWP training).

ROADTRAIN’s Telescopic handler training and Endorsement course in NZ

The purpose of the telescopic handler training course in NZ is to create telehandler operators who have the knowledge, abilities, and characteristics necessary to operate telehandlers safely. The trainees will also be able to exhibit the proper duties of a telehandler operator, with an emphasis on accident prevention and operator accountability.

Course Content

  • Control measures for potential dangers are outlined here in accordance with the needs of the company.
  • Before being put to use, telescopic handlers and attachments undergo inspection and preparation.
  • Operate a telehandler.
  • Proceed with post-operational procedures as necessary. 

Course Prerequisites

Experience operating a telehandler is a necessary prerequisite.

Assessment process

First, the student is tested on their knowledge of the material, then they are put through a practical simulation to demonstrate their ability to do all of the essential activities. In order to complete the assessment, you will need to operate a telehandler equipped with forks.

Revalidation/Refresher

It is essential that training be updated on a regular basis in order to keep up with current trends and maintain adequate levels of expertise. This could be different for you depending on the field that you work in.

We hope that this blog post gives you some clarity as to what are the requirements for using a telehandler in today’s world. If you have more questions, feel free to get in touch with us today!